The the arrival of June and the end of the official TV season, ratings take their annual summer nap. With big imports such as Survivor and The Good Doctor resting until Fall, only three shows in English Canada cracked the million viewer mark the week of May 30-June 5 according to Numeris. Number One was

Numeris, Canada’s broadcast measurement authority, last week sent out a correction to its Top-30 list of most-watched shows across Canada for May 23 to 29. The final results vary quite a bit from what was originally reported. Survivor remains in the top spot for its season finale, but the total is more than a quarter

Dusty Saunders, who passed away early this week at 90, started working as a copy boy at the Rocky Mountain News 1953. He worked for the Denver newspaper, which doesn’t exist anymore, for 56 years. Almost all of that time he wrote about television. He started before that was really a beat; he had to

Ronnie Hawkins, simply known as “The Hawk” when he tore up the Yonge Street strip in the late ’50s, early ’60s, died May 29 at 87. Remembered for his full-throated cover of Bo Diddley’s “Who Do You Love,” the Arkansas-born singer-songwriter jammed with rock and roll’s earliest pioneers. They included Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins,

To have not done a podcast with Kenneth Welsh — what an opportunity lost. Welsh died May 5 at 80 years of age. He burned so bright for so many years that 80 seems both impossibly long and way too short for such an incendiary life. You could not cover television in Canada throughout the

David Birney, who passed away April 27 in Santa Monica, Calif., is best known to TV audiences for two one-season roles — and one unhappy marriage. His first starring TV role was as Bernie Steinberg, a Jewish cabdriver with writing ambitions married to Irish Catholic schoolteacher Bridget Fitzgerald on the CBS sitcom Bridget Loves Bernie

Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner wrote a sterling exit for Robert Morse. Towards the end of the series’ run, Morse’s character —  ad firm patriarch Bertram Cooper – dies at home shortly after witnessing the best ad line ever uttered on television: Neil Armstrong’s “That’s one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for

“People used to describe us as pot smoking hippies on welfare.” That was Paul Pope, the dean of Newfoundland TV and film production, describing his early days in an industry he helped create. I knew him for one day, but it was memorable, and he told me the secret to making Canadian television. That day