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As someone old enough to have watched Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In back in the late ’60s, early ’70s, I was horrified by the shoddy salute Netflix dumped into its streaming service Tuesday. It was offensive and abysmal, and, as Edith Anne used to say, “That’s the truth. PFFFFT.” The original Laugh-In (1968 – 73) was

All together now (to the tune of the theme from The Brady Bunch): Here’s the story/of a man named Marshall/who grew up within three feet of the TV/Now his son sits/right beside him/forced to watch the entire run of The Bradys… This is also the story of Marshall Jay Kaplan and his son Ben Kaplan,

There was something very Cold War creepy and “of its time” about The Twilight Zone. The classic CBS series, which ran from 1959 to 1964, was a perfect fit in a black and white era where no colour ever distracted from the stark reality at the heart of all good science fiction. Somebody, someday, will

For me, The Beatles’ 1964 classic “A Hard Day’s Night” is how I measure singer-songwriters and comedy chops. Take Ringo Starr for instance. Just turned 24 the month the film was released, the fab drummer steps in front of a camera and before you can say, “Act Naturally,” he does. He’s walking by a riverbank,

Did you know that China is now the second biggest market in the world for wine? That’s just one of the things I learned watching “My Farmland,” an interesting look at how things are changing down on the farm in Canada. The 44-minute documentary premieres Friday on CBC DOCS. Award-winning filmmaker Diana Dai has produced

You may only know Ricky Gervais as the pissy host of the Golden Globes, or the jerky boss from the original Office.  Now, in his incredibly dark, smart new comedy After Life, Gervais challenges audiences with a next-level, complicated jerk – more mature, a bit more sensitive, and totally irresistible. After Life is the story of a

I didn’t expect to dig Diggstown as much as I do, but I do. The story takes place in North Preston, Nova Scotia, billed as Canada’s Largest Black Community. At the centre stands Marcia Diggs (Vinessa Antoine, above left with Karen LeBlanc), a rising star, big city, corporate lawyer who – for reasons unclear in